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New Yorker Films Update

March 7, 2013



Black Girl Sembene Shadow and Act



Tambay A. Obenson kicks of Shadow and Act's "filmmaker's series" with
Ousmane Sembène's
Black Girl.
Follow the discussion at Shadow and Act.

Watch the trailer for Black Girl/La Noire de

BLACK_GIRL_trailer

Visit our Black Girl/La Noire de page here.

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New Yorker Films Update

January 15, 2013



Nagisa Oshima



Nagisa Oshima passed away today. He was 80. One of New Yorker Films' great directors, Oshima may have been best known in the West for his Brechtian tour-de-force DEATH BY HANGING, his erotic masterpiece IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES, and the David Bowie/Tom Conti vehicle MERRY CHRISTMAS, MR. LAWRENCE. He was the most important figure in Japanese cinema since the classical era of Ozu, Mizoguchi, and Kurosawa. Often compared to the French New Wave and Godard in particular, Oshima had in fact moved parallel to (and often ahead of) European trends more than he followed them.

New Yorker's earliest Oshima acquisitions included 1965's YUNBOGI'S DIARY, MAN WHO LEFT HIS WILL ON FILM (1970) and THE CEREMONY (1971). Through the years CRUEL STORY OF YOUTH (1960), THE SUN'S BURIAL (1960), NIGHT AND FOG IN JAPAN (1960), DEATH BY HANGING (1968), DIARY OF A SHINJUKU THIEF (1969), BOY (1969), DEAR SUMMER SISTER (1972) and Oshima's last film, TABOO (1999) would also be released by New Yorker.

Complex, audacious, and dynamic, mixing violence, eroticism, politics, self-reflexivity, and dazzling camerawork, Nagisa Oshima's filmmaking will forever represent a seminal link between modernism and non-Western modes of perception.

Nagisa Oshima obituary

Watch the trailer for Taboo

TABOO trailer
Visit our Taboo page here.

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January 3, 2013


Hors Satan museum of moving image momi

Programmed by Dennis Lim, editor of Moving Image Source; Rachael Rakes, Assistant Curator of Film; and David Schwartz, Chief Curator
T
First Look is the Museum’s annual showcase for inventive, groundbreaking new
international cinema. Many of the films in this year’s edition take the form of journeys—geographical, emotional, and artistic—and the series itself is a journey, with 26 works, feature-length and short films, from a dozen countries. The films are by established masters and emerging filmmakers, and almost all are New York premieres.

With its debut in 2012, First Look was instantly recognized as a vital new addition to New York’s film scene, an oasis of thoughtful and provocative filmmaking amid the hype and noise of the awards season. It is a great way for New York filmgoers to start the year, just ahead of the Sundance and Rotterdam film festivals. In its second year, First Look has expanded its breadth, with genre-defying and boundary-pushing works of all forms, demonstrating how cinematic creativity and depth can be found in modes as divergent as action movies and the avant-garde.

"Now in just its second year, the Museum of the Moving Image's First Look is already proving itself to be one of the most noteworthy curatorial efforts anywhere."—David Hudson, Fandor

Tickets for screenings (with the exception of opening night) are included with Museum admission ($12 adults / $9 students and senior citizens). A First Look series pass, allowing the holder admission to the Museum and all First Look screenings for the run of the series, will again be available. All screenings, with the exception of the opening event, are free for Museum members (members receive a discount on opening night tickets). Memberships start at $75 with benefits that include year-round free admission to the Museum and its programs, reservation privileges, and discounts on special programs.

Visit the museum's First Look HORS SATAN page here.

Buy tickets here.

HORS SATAN opens at Anthology Film Archives on January 18.

Visit our HORS SATAN page here.

Watch the trailer.

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For over forty-five years, New Yorker Films has been America's leading source for the films on the cutting edge of world cinema. The company was founded in 1965 by Daniel Talbot as an outgrowth of his legendary movie house, the New Yorker Theater. Unable to obtain several crucial foreign titles, Talbot was obliged to import them himself. Early acquisitions such as Bertolucci's BEFORE THE REVOLUTION, Godard's LES CARABINIERS, and Sembene's BLACK GIRL established New Yorker's still vital tradition of presenting the world's most innovative, artistically significant, and politically engaged films.

Controversial and challenging works considered untouchable by other distributors have been regularly taken on by New Yorker (and often turned into surprise hits), including Jacques Rivette's self-reflexive masterpiece CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING, Chantal Akerman's feminist landmark JEANNE DIELMAN..., and Claude Lanzmann's monumental Holocaust documentary SHOAH, to mention just a few. Always on the alert for fresh talent and new trends, New Yorker Films was the primary force in introducing this country to the pioneering postmodernist New German cinema, the politically embattled Latin American cinema, and the postcolonial African cinema. It discovered the early breakthrough works of such now-celebrated filmmakers as Agnieszka Holland, Juzo Itami, Errol Morris, Wayne Wang, and Zhang Yimou. More recent acquisitions have explored exciting new frontiers in the Iranian, Asian, and Eastern European cinemas.

In addition to its theatrical premieres, New Yorker's strength is its ability to service the nontheatrical market, catering to the specialized needs of festivals, film society and classroom venues that fall beneath the radar of larger, more monolithic companies. The heart of New Yorker Films is a library of unsurpassed quality and depth. The library's range extends from restored classics to recent causes célèbres, from Oscar winners to offbeat gems. The New Yorker library is a major source for trailblazing works by international women filmmakers such as Claire Denis, Lucrecia Martel, Lisa Cholodenko, Agnes Jaoui, Susanne Bier, Euzhan Palcy, and Margarethe von Trotta. It also features essential titles by leading lights of the American indie renaissance. A distinctive feature of the library is its devotion to accumulating works by important individual directors -- a policy especially suited to retrospectives and university courses. Here you will find an extensive collection of films by such seminal cinéastes as Alea, Almodóvar, Godard, Herzog, Sembene, Straub, Tanner, and Zhang Yimou.

In 1989, New Yorker Films extended its tradition of quality into the video market.  An average of twenty new titles per year are released on DVD/Blu-ray, representing a broad selection of the best in classic, foreign, and independent cinema.

One of the more exciting recent developments at New Yorker Films is the creation of a new division called Metro Releasing, a genre division with the same discerning sensibilities of New Yorker past/present, that will also appeal to niche audiences.

In a time when the term "independent" has been loosely applied to subsidiaries of giant conglomerates, New Yorker stands as one of the most durable, important, and truly independent film distributors. In its fourth decade, New Yorker Films still represents the vanguard of film distribution in the United States.


For over forty-five years, New Yorker Films has been America's leading source
for the films that matter on the cutting edge of world cinema.

The company was founded in 1965 by Daniel Talbot as an outgrowth of
his legendary movie house, the New Yorker Theater. Unable to obtain
several crucial foreign titles, Talbot was obliged to import them himself. Early
acquisitions such as Bertolucci's BEFORE THE REVOLUTION, Godard's LES
CARABINIERS, and Sembene's BLACK GIRL established New Yorker's still vital
tradition of presenting the world's most innovative, artistically significant, and
politically engaged films.

Controversial and challenging works considered untouchable by other
distributors have been regularly taken on by New Yorker (and often turned into
surprise hits), including Jacques Rivette's self-reflexive masterpiece CELINE
AND JULIE GO BOATING, Chantal Akerman's feminist landmark JEANNE
DIELMAN..., and Claude Lanzmann's monumental Holocaust documentary
SHOAH, to mention just a few. Always on the alert for fresh talent and new
trends, New Yorker Films was the primary force in introducing this country to the
pioneering postmodernist New German cinema, the politically embattled Latin
American cinema, and the postcolonial African cinema. It discovered the early
breakthrough works of such now-celebrated filmmakers as Agnieszka Holland,
Juzo Itami, Errol Morris, Wayne Wang, and Zhang Yimou. More recent
acquisitions have explored exciting new frontiers in the Iranian, Asian, and
Eastern European cinemas.

In addition to its theatrical premieres, New Yorker's strength is its ability to
service the nontheatrical market, catering to the specialized needs of festivals,
film society and classroom venues that fall beneath the radar of larger, more
monolithic companies. The heart of New Yorker Films is a library of unsurpassed
quality and depth. The library's range extends from restored classics to recent
causes célèbres, from Oscar winners to offbeat gems. The New Yorker library
is a major source for trailblazing works by international women filmmakers such
as Claire Denis, Lucrecia Martel, Lisa Cholodenko, Agnes Jaoui, Susanne Bier,
Euzhan Palcy, and Margarethe von Trotta. It also features essential titles by
leading lights of the American indie renaissance. A distinctive feature of the
library is its devotion to accumulating works by important individual directors -
- a policy especially suited to retrospectives and university courses. Here you
will find an extensive collection of films by such seminal cinéastes as Alea,
Almodóvar, Godard, Herzog, Sembene, Straub, Tanner, and Zhang Yimou.

In 1989, New Yorker Films extended its tradition of quality into the video
market. An average of twenty new titles per year are released on DVD/
Blu-ray, representing a broad selection of the best in classic, foreign, and
independent cinema.

One of the more exciting recent developments at New Yorker Films is the

creation of a new division called Metro Releasing, a genre division with the same
discerning sensibilities of New Yorker past/present, that will also appeal to niche
audiences.

In a time when the term "independent" has been loosely applied to subsidiaries
of giant conglomerates, New Yorker stands as one of the most durable,
important, and truly independent film distributors. In its fourth decade, New
Yorker Films still represents the vanguard of film distribution in the United States.

4
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